Re: TCP/IP Fiber Optic Ring Backbone


Russ Nelson (sun.soe.clarkson.edu!nelson@tcgould.tn.cornell.edu)
1 Apr 88 15:18:10 GMT


In article <8803292224.AA13808@trout.nosc.mil> carrs@TROUT.NOSC.MIL (Stephen M. Carr) writes:
> c. Implementation of IEEE 802.3 in a ring topology seems to
>me would require something akin to the opposite of IEEE 802.4
>Token Bus. In other words, implement me a bus protocol in a ring
>topology. Not that IEEE 802.4 doesn't make sense, but it appears
>that essentially the MAP folks have implemented a ring protocol
>in a bus environment. I am sure they have their reasons, the MAP
>community isn't stupid. But what about implementing IEEE 802.3
>in a ring topology? Is this for real? I confess, I am ignorant.

Well, I did a Master's thesis on a network that was similar to what
you're talking about. Physically and electrically the network was a
token passing ring. Logically, it was a bus, in the sense that there
was only one transmitter active at a time, and all information was
received by all nodes at the same time. So, I do think that IEEE
802.3 could be implemented in a ring technology, albeit without token
passing.

As an aside, the header that I used was remarkably similar to the
Ethernet header, but with one octet addresses. I guess round wheels
get reinvented all the time.
-russ

--
-russ
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