The multi-home problem again


mills@dcn6.arpa
18-Jul-86 17:34:12-UT


Folks,

I wondered why it took so long to resolve ISI.EDU names and discovered the
following, which I'm sure you will enjoy. A request to resolve A.ISI.EDU sent
to [10.0.0.51] (SRI-NIC.ARPA) returns [10.2.0.27], [10.1.33.27], [128.9.0.33],
[10.1.0.52] and [128.9.0.32]. The fuzzball namesolver starts cranking on this
list and the following nonsense comes back:

16:04:13 Server [10.2.0.27] [responded from address 128.9.0.33]
16:04:18 Server [10.2.0.27] [responded from address 128.9.0.33]
16:04:23 Server [10.2.0.27] [responded from address 128.9.0.33]
16:04:29 Server [10.1.33.27] [no response]
16:04:34 Server [10.1.33.27] [no response]
16:04:39 Server [10.1.33.27] [no response]
16:04:40 Server [128.9.0.33] [responded with requested data [26.3.0.103]

Yes, I really mean that the requests to [10.2.0.27] came back, apparently with
valid data, but the address in the IP source-address field was [128.9.0.33],
which certainly violates the Principle of Least Astonishment. It turns out all
three of these addresses belong to VAXA.ISI.EDU, but on different networks, so
that host is clearly fuddled.

The last buzzard to catch this bug was SRI-NIC.ARPA. Apparently, it bites
VAXen too. Hans-Werner Braun reports seeing responses from some servers coming
back with [127.0.0.1] in the IP source-address field. That bit of cosmic
goofiness would certainly amuse our Martian friends.

Dave
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